The Driving Force Of Rainmaking

Today let’s talk about the driving forces in Rainmaking.

The driving force of your business creates business power and propels forward movement in your company.

Each force layers on top of another, forming an increasing crescendo which develops into significant progress in your business.

History shows the importance of a driving force

IBM and Kodak are two companies who strayed from their driving forces.

IBM was computer-driven and Kodak was film-driven.

While both companies had different core focuses, they tried to compete against Xerox for business in the copier world.

They foolishly tried to unseat a company when they had no business competing in that realm.

While both IBM and Kodak had significant amounts of money and access to additional capital, they weren’t true to their driving forces.

Xerox was already the leader in the high-speed copier market; Xerox had driving forces in that arena.

IBM and Kodak are not driven in the same way that Xerox is driven.

Neither company has the technology or focused skills to be able to compete in that realm.

As a result, they lost hundreds of millions of dollars and had to retreat, ceding victory to Xerox.

Xerox, however, didn’t emerge a total champion. Later down the road, they were devastated by Canon due to their own business mistakes.

Other large companies have been distracted by competition and veered away from their driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T are all major companies who should have been focused on the Internet’s infrastructure and cellular technology.

Instead, they veered off course and tried to get into the mainframe computer business in order to compete against IBM.

IBM failed in its attempt to compete against Xerox but they excelled in their core competency.

While RCA, GE and AT&T are all huge companies with substantial market caps, IBM held them off.

This is because IBM remained true to its driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T didn’t have the technology, areas of excellence or driving force to compete against IBM, a company that specialized in that arena. These companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars in their bids to compete.

Identify your driving force

Once you identify your driving force, it will keep your business on track and your entire company will be a Rainmaker.

You won’t be distracted with extraneous ideas or competition.

If you fail to know your driving force, you’ll be easily seduced by things you shouldn’t be doing.

When you begin developing products and pursuing markets in which you have absolutely no business, you only cost your company capital, energy and time.

Analyzing your business

In order to identify your driving force, you must understand your business concept.

At the Rainmaker Summit Bill Walsh and the Powerteam will help you to effectively analyze your business to identify your driving force.

You see, so many people have blurry business concepts, and a clouded business message is doomed to fail for two reasons.

First of all, you can’t remain on track to success if you don’t know what that track entails.

Secondly, you won’t be able to get the support you need to succeed if you can’t articulate your core business.

When people clearly hear what drives your business, they can then get behind it.

As you mold your business concept by attending the Rainmaker Summit, you’ll be better able to properly align your resources so that you can grow your business rapidly.

In the process, you’ll also identify your rallying cry, thereby giving your business its own unique voice.

As you continue to classify your business plan, you’ll see that each step in the process builds on the prior, just as your company’s driving forces layer on each other.

That momentum propels your company to eventual success… and ultimately a Rainmaking business.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.

The Driving Force Of Rainmaking

Today let’s talk about the driving forces in Rainmaking.

The driving force of your business creates business power and propels forward movement in your company.

Each force layers on top of another, forming an increasing crescendo which develops into significant progress in your business.

History shows the importance of a driving force

IBM and Kodak are two companies who strayed from their driving forces.

IBM was computer-driven and Kodak was film-driven.

While both companies had different core focuses, they tried to compete against Xerox for business in the copier world.

They foolishly tried to unseat a company when they had no business competing in that realm.

While both IBM and Kodak had significant amounts of money and access to additional capital, they weren’t true to their driving forces.

Xerox was already the leader in the high-speed copier market; Xerox had driving forces in that arena.

IBM and Kodak are not driven in the same way that Xerox is driven.

Neither company has the technology or focused skills to be able to compete in that realm.

As a result, they lost hundreds of millions of dollars and had to retreat, ceding victory to Xerox.

Xerox, however, didn’t emerge a total champion. Later down the road, they were devastated by Canon due to their own business mistakes.

Other large companies have been distracted by competition and veered away from their driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T are all major companies who should have been focused on the Internet’s infrastructure and cellular technology.

Instead, they veered off course and tried to get into the mainframe computer business in order to compete against IBM.

IBM failed in its attempt to compete against Xerox but they excelled in their core competency.

While RCA, GE and AT&T are all huge companies with substantial market caps, IBM held them off.

This is because IBM remained true to its driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T didn’t have the technology, areas of excellence or driving force to compete against IBM, a company that specialized in that arena. These companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars in their bids to compete.

Identify your driving force

Once you identify your driving force, it will keep your business on track and your entire company will be a Rainmaker.

You won’t be distracted with extraneous ideas or competition.

If you fail to know your driving force, you’ll be easily seduced by things you shouldn’t be doing.

When you begin developing products and pursuing markets in which you have absolutely no business, you only cost your company capital, energy and time.

Analyzing your business

In order to identify your driving force, you must understand your business concept.

At the Rainmaker Summit Bill Walsh and the Powerteam will help you to effectively analyze your business to identify your driving force.

You see, so many people have blurry business concepts, and a clouded business message is doomed to fail for two reasons.

First of all, you can’t remain on track to success if you don’t know what that track entails.

Secondly, you won’t be able to get the support you need to succeed if you can’t articulate your core business.

When people clearly hear what drives your business, they can then get behind it.

As you mold your business concept by attending the Rainmaker Summit, you’ll be better able to properly align your resources so that you can grow your business rapidly.

In the process, you’ll also identify your rallying cry, thereby giving your business its own unique voice.

As you continue to classify your business plan, you’ll see that each step in the process builds on the prior, just as your company’s driving forces layer on each other.

That momentum propels your company to eventual success… and ultimately a Rainmaking business.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.

The Driving Force Of Rainmaking

Today let’s talk about the driving forces in Rainmaking.

The driving force of your business creates business power and propels forward movement in your company.

Each force layers on top of another, forming an increasing crescendo which develops into significant progress in your business.

History shows the importance of a driving force

IBM and Kodak are two companies who strayed from their driving forces.

IBM was computer-driven and Kodak was film-driven.

While both companies had different core focuses, they tried to compete against Xerox for business in the copier world.

They foolishly tried to unseat a company when they had no business competing in that realm.

While both IBM and Kodak had significant amounts of money and access to additional capital, they weren’t true to their driving forces.

Xerox was already the leader in the high-speed copier market; Xerox had driving forces in that arena.

IBM and Kodak are not driven in the same way that Xerox is driven.

Neither company has the technology or focused skills to be able to compete in that realm.

As a result, they lost hundreds of millions of dollars and had to retreat, ceding victory to Xerox.

Xerox, however, didn’t emerge a total champion. Later down the road, they were devastated by Canon due to their own business mistakes.

Other large companies have been distracted by competition and veered away from their driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T are all major companies who should have been focused on the Internet’s infrastructure and cellular technology.

Instead, they veered off course and tried to get into the mainframe computer business in order to compete against IBM.

IBM failed in its attempt to compete against Xerox but they excelled in their core competency.

While RCA, GE and AT&T are all huge companies with substantial market caps, IBM held them off.

This is because IBM remained true to its driving forces.

RCA, GE and AT&T didn’t have the technology, areas of excellence or driving force to compete against IBM, a company that specialized in that arena. These companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars in their bids to compete.

Identify your driving force

Once you identify your driving force, it will keep your business on track and your entire company will be a Rainmaker.

You won’t be distracted with extraneous ideas or competition.

If you fail to know your driving force, you’ll be easily seduced by things you shouldn’t be doing.

When you begin developing products and pursuing markets in which you have absolutely no business, you only cost your company capital, energy and time.

Analyzing your business

In order to identify your driving force, you must understand your business concept.

At the Rainmaker Summit Bill Walsh and the Powerteam will help you to effectively analyze your business to identify your driving force.

You see, so many people have blurry business concepts, and a clouded business message is doomed to fail for two reasons.

First of all, you can’t remain on track to success if you don’t know what that track entails.

Secondly, you won’t be able to get the support you need to succeed if you can’t articulate your core business.

When people clearly hear what drives your business, they can then get behind it.

As you mold your business concept by attending the Rainmaker Summit, you’ll be better able to properly align your resources so that you can grow your business rapidly.

In the process, you’ll also identify your rallying cry, thereby giving your business its own unique voice.

As you continue to classify your business plan, you’ll see that each step in the process builds on the prior, just as your company’s driving forces layer on each other.

That momentum propels your company to eventual success… and ultimately a Rainmaking business.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.

The post The Driving Force Of Rainmaking appeared first on Rainmaker Tips.